Photo of bee with fingers as legs

Bees actually have six legs, but when it's a craft, you can use your imagination right?

This fat bumblebee only has two legs, but those two legs actually move, because they are your own fingers!

(Make your own bee antenna or try out a pipe cleaner bee!)

All you will need for this simple craft is:

Yellow cardstock
White cardstock
Two googly eyes
Black marker
Tape
Scissors
Hole puncher

Begin by cutting out a circle from the yellow cardstock about 3 inches in diameter. The cut two heart shapes out of the white cardstock and trim the bottom points off so they are flat on bottom with two rounded tops. These half-hearts will be your wings.

Photo of craft pieces cut out

Use the black marker to put lines on the bottom half of your yellow circle.

Flip the yellow circle over and place the half hearts with flat side facing in on the edge of each side of the yellow circle. Tape the wings down.

Photo of wings taped to bee

Flip over and add two googly eyes above the black lines on the front of the bee.

Use your hole puncher to create holes near the bottom of the bee. Don't get too close to the edge or the bee will break when you put your fingers through. The holes can be smaller for kids or larger for adults.

Photo of finished bee craft

Put your pointer and middle finger through the holes up to the first knuckle. Your bee now has legs that wiggle!

Try some more fun animal crafts that move like our floppy fish and  leaping frog origami!

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