What if you couldn’t have any almonds or cashews in that nut mix you love to snack on?

What if you couldn’t eat sesame chicken because sesame didn’t exist anymore?

What if bananas, blueberries and tomatoes weren’t on the shelves anymore?

One in three bites of food that we take is due to pollinators, and some of your favorite foods are probably on the list of crops that would be gone if our pollinators vanish due to lack of habitat, food sources and climate changes.

What are some of the crops that need insect pollination to survive?

What are insect-pollinated crops that begin with the letter A?

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What are insect-pollinated crops that begin with the letter B?

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What are insect-pollinated crops that begin with the letter C?

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What are insect-pollinated crops that begin with the letter F?

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What are insect-pollinated crops that begin with the letter G?

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What are insect-pollinated crops that begin with the letter K?

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What are insect-pollinated crops that begin with the letter M?

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What are insect-pollinated crops that begin with the letter N?

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What are insect-pollinated crops that begin with the letter P?

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What are insect-pollinated crops that begin with the letter R?

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What are insect-pollinated crops that begin with the letter S?

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What are insect-pollinated crops that begin with the letter T?

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What are insect-pollinated crops that begin with the letter V?

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10 pollinator crafts

Do you love pollinators as much as we do? Then try out some of our favorite pollinator-themed crafts!

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Eight forgotten pollinators

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Free pollinator activity book download

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You’ve learned that pollinator populations are dwindling and that you can help by planting native species in your garden to provide habitat and food sources. But what do you plant? It can be overwhelming to look at all the options of native flowers that you can put in your garden. It’s even a lot for…

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Without buzz pollination, we wouldn’t have blueberries

Most of the time bees can access pollen pretty easily on the anther of a flower, like in the video above; it is passively released by the flower and coats the hairs of pollinators that come to the flower to drink its nectar and gather its pollen. However, about eight percent of flowering plants have…

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Native bees: Mason bees are fantastic pollinators

Mason bees might be the best pollinators of all bees. Instead of wetting pollen and putting it in pollen sacs like honeybees, mason bees are covered in hair that collects pollen as they move around, searching for nectar. They can certainly carry a lot of pollen and significant pollinators for apple, cherry and plum trees. (Try…

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